NHÂN DÂN VIỆT NAM.ORG
TIẾNG NÓI CỦA MỘT SỐ NGƯỜI VIỆT YÊU NƯỚC TRONG NUỚC VÀ HẢI NGOẠI VẬN ĐỘNG TOÀN DÂN QUYẾT TÂM
CÓ NGÀY VUI ĐẠI THẮNG VIỆT NAM III LÀ ĐẬP TAN ÂM MƯU DBHB CỦA ĐẾ QUỐC MỸ, GIẢI TRỪ VÀ GIẢI HOẶC
GIẶC ÁO ĐEN VATICAN – GIẶC ÁO ĐEN BẢN ĐỊA – GIẶC TIN LÀNH

    Giới thiệu một số website:

   * Cong San
   * Nhan Dan
   * Cong An
   * Cong An N.D.
   * Quan Doi N.D
   * Lao Dong
   * Thanh Nien
   * Tuoi Tre
   * Saigon G, P.
   * VNA Net
   * Voice of V.N.
   * www.chuyenluan.com
   * www.duoctue.org
   * www.khuongviet.net
   * www.nguoivietyeunuoc.org
   * www.nguyentua.com
   * www.dongduongthoibao.net
   * www.dongduongthoibao.com
   * home.comcast.net/~charlieng


   

GẦN 100 NGÀN NGƯỜI CHỐNG CHIẾN TRANH IRAQ TẠI WASHINGTON, D.C-RÚT QUÂN TỨC KHẮC


Iraq war protestors Christina Cauterucci, of Bedford, N.H., right foreground, and Christopher Dicks of Worcester, Mass., left foreground, join a 'die in' protest on Capitol Hill, Saturday, Sep. 15, 2007, in Washington.  At least 150 protesters were arrested Saturday as thousands of demonstrators marched to the Capitol demanding an end to the Iraq war.  (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

 

More Than 190 Arrested at D.C. Protest 

By MATTHEW BARAKAT, Associated Press Writer

 

 

The group marched from the White House to the Capitol to demand an end to the Iraq war. Their numbers stretched for blocks along Pennsylvania Avenue, and they held banners and signs and chanted, "What do we want? Troops out. When do we want it? Now."

 

Army veteran Justin Cliburn, 25, of Lawton, Okla., was among a contingent of Iraq veterans in attendance.

 

"We're occupying a people who do not want us there," Cliburn said of Iraq. "We're here to show that it isn't just a bunch of old hippies from the 60s who are against this war."

 

 

art.war.protest.ap.jpg

 

War protestors take to the streets of Washington, calling for the withdrawal of U.S. troops in Iraq. Along the way, they encounter supporters of the war. The march ends at the U.S. Capitol, with some arrests.

 

Counterprotesters lined the sidewalks behind metal barricades. There were some heated shouting matches between the two sides.

 

The arrests came after protesters lay down on the Capitol lawn in what they called a "die in" — with signs on top of their bodies to represent soldiers killed in Iraq. When police took no action, some of the protesters started climbing over a barricade at the foot of the Capitol steps.

 

Many were arrested without a struggle after they jumped over the waist-high barrier. But some grew angry as police with shields and riot gear attempted to push them back. At least two people were showered with chemical spray. Protesters responded by throwing signs and chanting: "Shame on you."

 

The number of arrests by Capitol Police on Saturday was much higher than previous anti-war rallies in Washington this year. Five people were arrested at a protest outside the Pentagon in March when they walked onto a bridge that had been closed off to accommodate the demonstration, then refused to leave. And at a rally in January, about 50 demonstrators blocked a street near the Capitol, but they were dispersed without arrests.

 

The protesters gathered earlier Saturday near the White House in Lafayette Park with signs saying "End the war now" and calling for President Bush's impeachment. The rally was organized by the ANSWER

 

Coalition and other groups.

 

Organizers estimated that nearly 100,000 people attended the rally and march. That number could not be confirmed; police did not give their own estimate. A permit for the march obtained in advance by the ANSWER Coalition had projected 10,000.

 

Anti-war activist Cindy Sheehan told the crowd is was time to be assertive.

 

"It's time to lay our bodies on the line and say we've had enough," she said. "It's time to shut this city down."

 

About 13 blocks away, nearly 1,000 counterprotesters gathered near the Washington Monument, frequently erupting in chants of "U-S-A" and waving American flags.

 

Retired Air Force Lt. Col. Robert "Buzz" Patterson, speaking from a stage to crowds clad in camouflage, American flag bandanas and Harley Davidson jackets, said he wanted to send three messages.

 

"Congress, quit playing games with our troops. Terrorists, we will find you and kill you," he said. "And to our troops, we're here for you, and we support you."

 

AP, ngày 16/9/07

nhandanvietnam.org, ngày 16/9/07



<Go Back>
Printer Friendly Page Send this Story to a Friend